A Primer on Fairtrade Jewellery and Bags

Why is Multilateral trade important?

Equitable business partnerships seek to form relationships between consumers and producers based on transparency and work to instill dignity and better communities. Through lifting artisans out of poverty and providing income for their creations, the reciprocal trade model alleviates some of the 20 million people living in slavery around the globe. Additionally, the scheme cultivates opportunities for consumers to better the lives of a global base of designers and producers while learning about their culture and country of origin.

What is the difference between the terms fairtrade and fair trade?

Essentially, when “fairtrade” is written as one word, It refers to a product that has received certification from the Fairtrade Foundation and is able to display its trademark and logo. Currently, “fairtrade” certification is not widely available for many gift, jewellery, and craft items. Nonetheless, there are many artisans and designers that are supported by accredited multilateral trade sources. Ethical companies working to promote ethically crafted traded jewellery and bags with the goal of providing artisans with a living wage may participate in this equal process.

What work is being done to promote an equitable business?

There are a number of initiatives and organizations active in countries around the world, including Trade objective Justice, the World Fair Trade Association, and the FairTrade Federation. In England, the British Association for Fair Trade Shops (BAFTS) is a partnership of independent importers and retailers working under the central goal of creating justice, equity, and better overall outcomes for producers working around the world. In order to be an eligible BAFTS retailer, a minimum of 70 percent of products must be sourced from established fair trade sources.

Why buy equitable jewellery and bags?

In England, the United States, and other countries, select brick-and-mortar boutiques and online stores feature exceptional Fairtrade jewellery, bags, and accessories from gifted producers and designers working in countries, including Africa, Central America, and South America. Ethical fashion has definetely moved from the hemp potato sac towards a more colourful and bold fashion that translates the latest trends. Brands, including Kenyan beads from Kazuri and handcrafted Cambodian goods from Saffron Winds, are thriving. These small companies are passionate about bettering artisan working and living environments, and present distinctive pieces fitting a wide range of personal styles. More and more consumers are ready to choose ethically crafted items over conventionally manufactured products with the idea to give something back to their community.


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